Superhot Review

As well as being a year that swept in many changes with AAA behemoths, VR, and updated console releases, 2016 was a distinctive year for the indie developer. Gamers where awed by personal projects that captured hearts and minds in unique, challenging ways with titles like The Witness, Stardew Valley, Inside, Abzu, Owlboy, this list can go on and on. One of the most surprisingly standout games of last year was Superhot thanks to its unique exploration of first-person shooting mechanics and its bold, often abrupt presentation. Indie games have their own sort of hype and expectations in comparison to AAA titles, often they go unnoticed until they are released and become widespread due to word of mouth or promotion from Steam, Sony or Microsoft. Its reliance on the game’s own merits often make successful indie releases deserving of their own praise which Superhot had certainly achieved in doing so making it one of the most influential and important games to play from 2016. Continue reading “Superhot Review”

Astroneer Pre-Alpha Review in Progress

Astroneer was released on Steam’s early access store a few weeks ago and has a small, yet dedicated following admiring it’s entertaining, exploratory features and easily accessible multiplayer capabilities. Since newer, updated versions will continuously roll out while the game is in people’s hands, consider this a quick summation of the game in its current, pre-alpha state. Continue reading “Astroneer Pre-Alpha Review in Progress”

Jazzpunk: Director’s Cut PS4 Review

Well made videogames are largely structured methodically with a sense of logic by very technically sound and dedicated professionals who tinker obsessively over computer screens in order to perfect the mechanics of their developing games. Jazzpunk takes any sense of internal logic that suits this description of most good videogames, throws it out the window and still remains consistently enjoyable thanks to its nonsensical features. Jazzpunk is the bad guy in a play that poisons coherence’s ear and marries his wife, it proudly embraces following non-sequiturs with more non-sequiturs taking the player on a unique journey with a colourful visual style reminiscent of a bygone era of Cold War politics, espionage, fifties/sixties animation but winds around the carousel of the surreal. It’s a stylistic mishmash of exaggerated set pieces inspired by pop culture all abruptly smashed together in the form of simplistic mini games and interactions that are bizarre and at the same time comedic. Although it may be brief, the sheer amount of high-quality content and attention to detail on display makes the game a fulfilling experience and deserving the price tag it currently has. Continue reading “Jazzpunk: Director’s Cut PS4 Review”